Autistic Bilingualism

So relatable 🙂

Autism and Expectations

I’m bilingual

My first language is English. It’s what my parents spoke at home, my first words and thoughts were English. I learnt Welsh when I went to Ysgol Feithryn (nursery). I would have been about two. It carried on into a first-language Welsh primary school, and then a secondary school where English was not permitted even in the playground (making it the ironically rebellious act). I did my GCSEs in Welsh. I learned French and German and a smattering of Japanese through the medium of Welsh.

I remember a teacher once saying to me (and time passed means it will be a clumsy paraphrase), “It must be so hard for all you second-language-Welsh pupils, you have to translate everything in your head. You see a table, you thing ‘table’ and then look for the Welsh word, ‘bwrdd’ and then you can say it.”

I looked blankly at her. I…

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Theory of mind(reading) — the silent wave

Realizing that you’re autistic when you’re an adult means you get to do a lot of searching. This takes multiple forms – soul-searching, Google-searching, memory-searching, and often, people-searching (the journey of finding others just like you). In my internet searching, I tripped over a staggering number of tidbits that clicked my entire world into place. […]

via Theory of mind(reading) — the silent wave

Square pegs – a touch of the ‘normals’. #autism

GREAT post by Sonia Boue! 😀

The other side

STU_1978DPP_001Photo by Stu Allsop – at RE:collections exhibition 2016 with my installation. 

And lo, it came to pass that one day in the later decades of my life I experienced a touch of the ‘normals’.

But please don’t worry – I am quite okay. In fact I’m more than okay. I’m frankly energised in ways I don’t yet fully comprehend.

And again – don’t worry – I haven’t been ‘cured’ of my autism or gone all typical overnight. I am still emphatically me, only I’m suddenly a me with a growing sense that there are others quite like me, rather than me being a somewhat ropey version of you (you – for the purposes of this post being the non-autistic reader).

You see this typicality runs very deep in our culture. It seems to me there’s always a best and correct way of doing things – indeed our whole learning…

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